School of Oom Yung Doe(tm), the Grandmaster Iron Kim Style
OOM YUNG DOE
The GRANDMASTER "IRON" KIM Style

Oom Yung Doe Grand Master Iron Kim demonstrates Kyong Gong Sul Bope
One of the many...

The 8 Martial Arts of Oom Yung Doe

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Bagwa Chung
(Chinese Style)

Bagwa walking positions enable one to move smoothly and lightly (like a coiled spring), with speed and power. Includes both offensive and defensive movements that balance the body. Develops internal and external strength.

More information on Bagwa Chung from the Oom Yung Doe student handbook

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Kung Fu
(Chinese Style)

Forms combine controlled soft and hard movements; develops flexibility, coordination, strength and speed. Movement becomes instinctive. Offensive and defensive movement is straight, but curves in all different directions and degrees, using more circles than angles.

More information on Kung Fu from the Oom Yung Doe student handbook

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Tai Chi Chung
(Chinese Style)

Combines both offensive and defensive applications. Movements are slow and graceful without using force or power. The speed of the breathing matches the speed of the movement. Develops internal strength, physical well-being and overall health.

More information on Tai Chi Chung from the Oom Yung Doe student handbook

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Hap Ki Do/Ai Ki Do
(Korean/Japanese Style)

In Hap Ki Do, movements are hard and soft. Target areas are the joints, pressure points and nerves. Close proximity to opponent is most beneficial. Hands and feet are equally used in offensive and defensive movements. Strikes are in all directions, and are more angles than circles.

Similarly, in Ai Ki Do, movements are hard and soft, and the target areas are the joints, pressure points and nerves. However, hands are usually used more than the feet. Offensive and defensive movements are applied in all different directions, angles and curves, and a very strong handgrip is used.

More information on Ai Ki Do and Hap Ki Do from the Oom Yung Doe student handbook

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Ship Pal Gae
(Chinese and Korean Style of Weapons)

Forms are soft and hard. Develops flexibility, coordination, strength and speed. The mind, body and weapons used must be as one. Strong eye contact is maintained with the opponent, and movements are usually offensive. The hands and feet are used in all different directions, with both angles and circles.

More information on Ship Pal Gae (18 Weapons) from the Oom Yung Doe student handbook

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Udo/Ju Jitsu
(Korean and Japanese Style)

The form is soft, and develops proper falling techniques without injury-by keeping the body flexible, and developing coordination and strength. The opponent's strength is used against them in offensive and defensive movements. Precise placement of the feet is vital. Very strong handgrips are applied over the opponent's entire body. Strikes are in all different directions, using more circles than angles.

More information on Udo from the Oom Yung Doe student handbook

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Kom Do/Samurai
(Korean and Japanese Style)

During this form, one keeps strong eye contact with the opponent, while at the same time watching the opponent's body. Excellent mental development is achieved. The mind, body and sword must be as one. Offensive and defensive movements are straight and to either side, with more circles than angles. Movement is usually in all different directions.

More information on Kom Doe from the Oom Yung Doe student handbook

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Kong Su / Tae Kwon Do
(Korean and Japanese Style)

The focus is on straight speed. Defenses are straight up, down, in, out, and side. Offense is straight, side, back and forward. The feet (especially front snap, side and reverse kick) are more often used than the hands.

The form is hard. The strikes are usually straight and in all different angles (offensive and defensive).

More information on Kong Su from the Oom Yung Doe student handbook

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